Germany- the future custodian of Sanskrit?

When we hear “Sanskrit”- we immediately hear, Shlokas, Mantras, divinity , Yoga and everything holy in the world.
But Sanskrit, the language of the divine, is today losing it’s presence in India. One can faintly listen to spoken Sanskrit, except may be in the small town of Shimoga in Karnataka and temples (where the priests utter Sanskrit mantras while worshipping the deity).The status of Sanskrit has reduced to a purely written language, which is maybe taught by some enthusiastic old folks in the city, who are worried and want to preserve the tradition and Culture in India. It is pretty sad, to see the state, of such a beautiful language, used as a medium in many influential books and scriptures, such as the Bhagavad Gita, Mahabharatha, Arthashastra and many more.
On the other hand, Sanskrit is being appreciated a lot in the West. There are dedicated centers of Indology in various Universities, who have dedicated all their efforts in decoding holy scriptures of India such as our Vedas and Puranas, which are written in Sanskrit. There are also dedicated institutes in the West, to decode Vedic Mathematics and Ayurveda, which are considered systems formulated by Indian Sages, way ahead of it’s time. All of these systems are also written in Sanskrit.
Among the countries in the west,Germany is one of the most enthusiastic country, wanting to learn and teach Sanskrit. They are amazed by the beauty of the language (which our own Indians do not appreciate), and there are currently 14 universities in Germany, dedicated to teaching Sanskrit.

Source:dailymail.co.uk

Source:dailymail.co.uk

Germany and India share a deep relationship, regarding Sanskrit that dates way back into the past. Max Müller- a renowned German Scholar, came all the way to Calcutta, to study the Vedas under the tutelage of Ramakrishna Pramhamsa (a renowned saint). In the process, Max was so moved by Sanskrit, that he decided to publish the first German<-> Sanskrit Dictionary in India. He made a such huge impact in India , and on Indians, that the Indian government honored him by putting his image onto a postal stamp.

Max Müller- Source:Google Images

Max Müller- Source:Google Images

Source: Google Images- postal stamp honoring Max Müller

Source: Google Images- postal stamp honoring Max Müller

The German language institute in India (known as Goethe Institute around the world) is also called “Max Mueller Bhavan”. This name was bestowed by the Indian government, and hence is not known in Germany. In Germany, if one says that they learnt German in Max Mueller Bhavan, they would be clueless. The only name that is synonymous with them is “Goethe Institut India”.
Another false presumption, that many people have is that German and Sanskrit is similar. This holds good only for the structure and word order, and not the actual words themselves.German does not contain words from Sanskrit, nor vice versa.

Do you think, that Sanskrit will be now preserved in Germany?

Do you wish to learn Sanskrit online? Then please enroll for an online Sanskrit course with us, on www.languagestation.org today!

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